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ICRC Mounts Historical Photograph Exhibit
Celebrating “Commonalities”

     During the month of October, beautiful images from the ICRC collection will be on view in the Ames Room at the Mystic & Noank Library (40 Library Street, Mystic). Charming pictures representing people, places, and events of the past tell the story of our community and the people who lived here, contributing to what it –  and we -are today.
Please join us for a reception in the Ames Room from 7:00 to 8:30PM on Monday, October 5th, but if you can’t make the reception, stop by and check out the exhibit which will be in place until the end of the month!


On the Web
     Thanks to member and volunteer, Marcus Maronn, the ICRC has an informative narrative and map on the website, ‘This is Mystic!’  The site features events, restaurants, and places to visit, sort of a one-stop shopping for fun things to do locally.  It’s great to have more community visibility!
Check it out at!

6th Annual History Fair
Hosted by the Groton Public Library

at 2 Newtown Road, Groton,
Saturday September 26th from 1-4 PM.
 The ICRC will have a table at the Fair along with other organizations representing local history including the Hempstead House, the New London County Historical Society, the DAR, the SAR, the Groton Historical Society, the Mystic River Historical Society, the Stonington Historical Society, the Denison Homestead, the Avery Association, the Friends of Fort Griswold and many others. History books and other memorabilia will be available for purchase. There will be door prizes and a colonial magician!! This free event is open to the public.

A Call for Volunteers!

We thank all members for their financial support.  Consider volunteering a little of your time during our open hours from 10:00 to 4:00 on Tuesdays and Thursdays.  It would be an opportunity to get to know our collections better and to greet visitors to the center. If we could obtain interested volunteers we would consider opening on an occasional Saturday to attract those visitors that can not come during a weekday. If you are interested in volunteering or would like more information contact us at:


The Journey of the Jonny Cake
By Jane Schoonover, ICRC Volunteer

             The original spelling of the word “jonny-cake” was “journey-cake,” and was so named because it could be prepared quickly and could be carried very easily by the Indians when they were making a long journey.
According to Thomas Hazard in his book, “The Jonny-cake papers of ‘Shepherd Tom,’” these delicious portable goodies were the “favorite food of the gods.”  Hazard notes that after the War of Independence the name journey-cakes morphed into the more familiar jonny-cakes.
Old fashioned journey-cakes were first made by the Narragansetts of Rhode Island.   The cakes had to be made on a red-oak journey-cake board, an essential implement of frontier cooking. According to an 1863 entry in “An American Glossary,”  journey-cakes consisted of corn meal, pounded in a wooden mortar   …The dough, when prepared, was spread upon a piece of shaved clapboard 3-4” wide-15-20” long, baked upon the hearth. When both sides were perfectly done it was called journey-cake or jonny-cake.”
“An American Glossary” continues, “This article of food was used by the Indians of the interior on their long marches to and from their summer resorts on the Southern shores of the Atlantic being Narragansett and Newport.” Sometimes on treks between Rhode Island and Cape Cod, the Indians would stop to rest in New Bedford where they refreshed themselves with the journey cakes they were carrying. The area behind that city’s historical society is aptly named Johnny Cake Hill. (Here in Connecticut we have our own Johnny Cake Hill Road in Old Lyme!)
Faith Damon Davison, ICRC member and former archivist for the Mohegan Tribe, has graciously shared the following recipe. Give it a try!

Recipe for Journey Cakes


2 cups of water
2 cups of corn meal
2 tsps. Salt
2 tbls. of butter (probably used animal grease)
½ cup dried fruit (cranberries, blueberries, cherries) or chopped nuts.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Stir in corn meal, salt, butter & berries or nuts. Place in the bottom of a greased 8” square pan and bake for 25 minutes. Cut into squares and serve. (Serves 6-8)

 Mark Your Calendars
for the Annual Membership Meeting
and Buffet Luncheon
November 14th from 11:30 – 2:30
at Go Fish
in Olde Mistick Village
Exit 90 off I-95

We are extremely fortunate to have as guest speaker, Dr. Brian D. Jones,
whose topic will be  “Five Things Everyone Should Know about the Native American Archaeology of Connecticut.” 


Dr. Jones began as Connecticut State Archaeologist in 2014. He has worked in the archaeology field for over 25 years. He received his undergraduate degree in Anthropology at Oberlin College in 1986. After living and traveling in Southeast Asia, he studied European prehistory at the University of Cologne, Germany; he returned to the U.S. in 1992 to complete his Ph.D. at the University of Connecticut at Storrs. Dr. Jones was engaged in various archaeological positions including a position as Tribal Archaeologist for the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center, Senior Archaeologist for AHS, Inc. in Storrs, Associate Director of UMass Archaeological Services in Amherst, and has taught as an adjunct in the Anthropology Department at UConn since 2004. His primary research focus is the archaeology of northeastern Native American cultures. His dissertation explored human adaptation to the changing climate at the end of the last Ice Age.

Hope to See You There!

Go Fish Mystic County's Sea Food Restaurant

   Welcome New Members!


A warm welcome to our newest members:
Bruce Carpenter, Craig Cipolla, Alice Foley, Neil Goodenough,
Chad Jones, Keli Levine, and John Russell  

Happy to have you on board!

Copyright © 2015 The Indian & Colonial Research Center, Inc., All rights reserved.
Membership applicationOur mailing address is:

The Indian & Colonial Research Center, Inc.

39 Main Street
P.O. Box 525

Old Mystic, CT 06372

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